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OK, you’re a documentary photographer. Or maybe you’re like a reportage photographer. You know ― that’s a strange thing, you know, because like some guy is killing a woman in front of you ― and like ― you’re taking a fucking picture of it. You’re not helping a woman save her life ― you’re getting a story.

*

Maybe you’re reach or something… with a secret life that you won’t tell anyone about no matter how lonely they are, or no matter how pretty they are you just won’t tell. Doesn’t matter I’ll guess.
I’ll tell you about yourself.

"
Robert Frank 
April, 22nd 2012 @ 01:28 / 2 / Permalink
"To suffer is one thing; another thing is living with the photographed images of suffering, which does not necessarily strengthen conscience and the ability to be compassionate. It can also corrupt them. Once one has seen such images, one has started down the road of seeing more – and more. Images transfix. Images anesthetize. An event known through photographs certainly becomes more real than it would have been if one had never seen the photographs. (…) But after repeated exposure to images it also becomes less real."
Susan Sontag, On Photography, 1977
February, 20th 2012 @ 01:52 / 4 / Permalink
Alex Webb  photos in this Lens slideshow
"War photography is easy. A colleague once called it ‘sports photography.’ You’re shooting sports as it happens in front of you and you’re just there to take the picture. If you have the bravery, or some might call it foolhardiness, to do it, then it’s easy. You don’t have to work at it in the same way as a long-term documentary project where you require intimacy from your subjects. You can just jump out of a plane and go into a war zone like Libya and start photographing. What I tell young people is the same thing that I was told: if you want to do this, you can."
November, 14th 2011 @ 13:19 / 4 / Permalink

Newsweek Photo: Famine in Africa's Horn

October, 27th 2011 @ 17:12 / 30 / Permalink
Lynsey Addario / VII for Newsweek
Turkana, Kenya. August 2011

Turkana, Kenya. August 2011

Famine in Somalia - LIFE Photo Gallery

In late July 2011, the United Nations declared the ongoing famine the worst in 20 years. Some 11.5 million people have been affected by drought in the region, but the 270-percent inflation rate in Somalia has made it financially impossible for companies to import food and make a profit. Two regions of southern Somalia especially hard can claim a malnutrition rate of 50 percent, with 10,000 dying each day of hunger. And the famine’s effects have spread to neighboring countries. In Dadaab, Kenya (pictured), a refugee camp meant for up to 90,000 Somalis fleeing the famine has growing into the largest refugee camp in the world, at four times that population.

September, 7th 2011 @ 19:25 / 55 / Permalink

KODAK by Felix Morisseau-Leroy

Tourist, don’t take my picture 
Don’t take my picture, tourist
I’m too ugly
Too dirty
Too meager and too thin
Don’t take my picture, white
Mr. Eastman wouldn’t approve
I’m too ugly, too thin
And your Kodak will break
I’m too dirty and too black
Your Kodak will burst
Don’t take my portrait, tourist
Let me be, white 
Don’t photograph my donkey
Donkeys here carry too much
Donkeys here are too little
Donkeys here don’t eat
Tourist, don’t shoot my house
My house is a house of hay
Don’t take a picture of my poor house
My house is a house of clay
Go shoot the National Palace
Shoot Bicentennial Avenue
But don’t take a picture of my garden
I have no plow or car or tractor
Don’t take a picture of my tree
Tourist, I’m barefoot
And my clothes are all torn
Isn’t this what you see?
Tourist, look at my hair
Your Kodak’s not used to its color.
Tourist, don’t take my picture
You won’t understand my pose
You won’t understand a thing
My affairs aren’t yours, tourist
Gimme five cents
And be on your way

 

(Translated by Jeffrey Knapp)

September, 6th 2011 @ 23:40 / Permalink
A girl holds a flower as she takes part in a march near Utoeya island to pay their respects for the victims of the killing spree and bomb attack in Norway, in the village of Sundvollen, northwest of Oslo, July 26, 2011. Norwegian  (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)

A girl holds a flower as she takes part in a march near Utoeya island to pay their respects for the victims of the killing spree and bomb attack in Norway, in the village of Sundvollen, northwest of Oslo, July 26, 2011. Norwegian  (Fabrizio Bensch/Reuters)

On the 22nd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown of June 4, 1989, nearly 100,000 people held a candlelight vigil in Hong Kong, which is the only Chinese city where the massacre can be publicly remembered.

On the 22nd anniversary of the Tiananmen Square crackdown of June 4, 1989, nearly 100,000 people held a candlelight vigil in Hong Kong, which is the only Chinese city where the massacre can be publicly remembered.

The artillery base at Camp Blessing, Afghanistan. 
Photograph by Tim Hetherington.

The artillery base at Camp Blessing, Afghanistan. 

Photograph by Tim Hetherington.

Winner of the 2010 Sundance Film Festival Grand Jury Prize for a Documentary, RESTREPO chronicles the deployment of a U.S. platoon of courageous American soldiers in Afghanistan’s Korengal Valley, considered to be one of the most dangerous postings in the U.S. military. 

"We’re at war," Hetherington said in an interview with The Associated Press before the Oscars. "We wanted to bring the war into people’s living room(s) and put it into the movie theaters, and get people to connect with it. It’s not necessarily about moral outrage. It’s about trying to understand that we’re at war and try to understand the emotional terrain of what being at war means.”

Tim Hetherington, “Restrepo” director and photojornalist, was killed in Misurata, Libya on April 20, 2011. Also killed was Chris Hondros, a New York-based photographer for Getty Images. Thank you for the courage, Tim and Chris, and rest in peace. 

April, 21st 2011 @ 19:23 / 13 / Permalink
"

I’m always looking outside
trying to look inside.
Trying to say something that’s true.
But maybe nothing is really true
Except what’s out there.
And what’s out there is always changing.


The truth is the way to reveal something about your life , your thoughts, where you stand. It doesn’t just stand there alone, the truth. It stands there combined with art. I want to make something that has more of the truth and not so much of art. Which means you have to go out on a limb- because people are more comfortable dealing with art than with the truth.

"
Robert Frank
December, 20th 2010 @ 21:49 / 1 / Permalink
Henri Cartier-Bresson, World’s Fair, Brussels, Belgium, 1958; gelatin silver print; collection Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris

Henri Cartier-Bresson, World’s Fair, Brussels, Belgium, 1958; gelatin silver print; collection Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson, Paris